top of page
Search
  • Writer's pictureSophie Beaudry

The Scoop on Fascia


My practice focuses mainly on myofascial release before muscle work or trigger point release. I have always said; ‘if I only had 5 minutes with a client, I would probably only focus on myofascial release before anything else.’ Rarely, I will not release a client’s fascial tissues before working on their muscles. From my experience, this is how I have achieved such great results with my clients. Therefore, I cannot even begin to count how many times I've had to explain to an individual, WHAT IS FASCIA? Everyone seems to be fully aware of what muscles are but completely in the dark about what fascia is. So here it is, my explanation in full detail. If you’re not interested in reading about all the nerdy science stuff, feel free to skip to the recap to get the short version.

So, what is fascia?

Fascia is a band or sheet of connective tissue that connects, supports and separates other tissues and organs in the human body. This connective tissue is divided into two parts, superficial and deep. The superficial layer is found immediately below the skin and is composed of loose connective tissue that contains a large amount of fat. The thickness of this layer varies from one region to another and, from one person to another. The deep layer of fascia is attached to the deeper part of the superficial layer and is made of dense and organized connective tissue. This layer englobes and separates muscles and other organs of the body.


In other words, fascia is a thin layer of tissue that is found beneath the skin, that surrounds your muscles, bones and all other organs of the body. Think of it as sausage casing or Saran Wrap that wraps around everything underneath the skin which connects, supports and separates tissues and organs.


Rather than being segmented or split into different sections, fascia tissue is found to be one continuous structure that exists from head to toe without interruption, connecting everything in the human body.


The main function of fascia is to allow skin, muscle and internal organs to slide easily with your movement and to allow passage of nerves and vessels from one region to another. Fascia is considered to be structural tissue that shapes us in comparison to muscles, which move us.


What causes fascial restrictions?


NOT DRINKING ENOUGH WATER. Fascia is composed of 70% water. If you are not drinking enough water, this tissue will become dehydrated which, in turn, causes it to be shortened and very stiff. Again, let’s bring it back to Saran Wrap, imagine leaving a piece of Saran Wrap in the sun for a long period. Think about how it would shorten and not be as pliable. The same thing happens with your fascia if it is not receiving enough water. And, once it becomes stiff, this is when the sensation of tightness, pain or a decrease in range of motion is seen. I cannot stress this enough,

DRINK YOUR WATER!

Another major cause of fascial restrictions is 21st-century human habits. Us as humans are very hard on our bodies. This can cause changes in our fascial tissues and result in unwanted aches and pains. These habits can include anything from overuse to underuse of the tissues, incorrect posture, trauma, chronic inflammation, surgical procedures as well as stress. It is important to access what could be causing your body harm in other to get to the root and properly fix it.


If you found this information interesting, please give it a like, comment below or subscribe to my channel to stay updated with new blog-posts.


RECAP:

In a nutshell, fascia is a thin layer of tissue that is found beneath the skin, that surrounds your muscles, bones and all other organs of the body. Think of it as sausage casing or Saran Wrap that wraps around everything underneath the skin which connects, supports and separates tissues and organs.


Possible causes of fascial restrictions:

- Dehydration

- Overuse/underuse

- Incorrect posture

- Trauma

- Chronic inflammation

- Surgical procedures

- Stress


RELATED ARTICLES:

Fascia Research from a Clinician/Scientist's Perspective by FINDLEY, T.W.


Fascial nomenclature: Update on related consensus process by SCHLEIP, R., HEDLEY, G. & YUCESOY, C.A.


What is 'fascia'? A review of different nomenclatures by SCHLEIP, R., JAGER, H. & KLINGER, W.


OTHER SOURCES:

Book:

Gray's Anatomy for Students by DRAKE, R.L., VOGL, A.W. & MITCHELL, A.W.M.


Website:

Fascia Research Society

 

This blog-post should not be interpreted as a systematic review. The information posted here was built on the scientific articles that I had at my disposal, which were interesting to me and relevant to the topic. Please feel free to comment below any links to scientific articles that are related to the subject.

 

166 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

Comments


bottom of page